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The Advantages Of A Baitcaster


fishing user avatarDailyBassin' reply : 

I'm more of a spinner-reel kind of guy, but one of my friends swears by baitcasting. I was wondering if any of you could provide me the advantages of a baitcaster over a spinner.

Thanks!


fishing user avatarjgordon reply : 

I also like the spinning the bait caster seemed like to much work. I recently played with one and liked it a little bit.  I've heard people say you have more control and feel for fish when using them.  Seems like you need lots of practice to get the casting down.  Im sure in the future I will end up with one but until then Ill rock the fairy wand.


fishing user avatarJanderson45 reply : 

this has been talked about ad nauseam I'm sure, but to sum it up in a few points for me...

 

Bait casters are typically used for heavier techniques, and hold heavier line.  For me, the casting rods and reels feel much more equipped to readily throw and retrieve heavier baits, and winch fish out of heavier cover.  Notice i said "winch".. the design of bait casting reels seems to give you a good deal more power over the fish, the line is being directly laid flat on a spool instead of coiling around it, leads to a more powerful "feel" even if the drag may not necessarily be stronger.

 

The second major advantage for bait casters in bass fishing is accuracy... with some practice using different techniques you can practically place a lure in the smallest places with little or no disruption to the water surface.. this is important in making fish holding heavy to cover strike out of pure reaction instead of feeding instinct.  With my casting rods I can flip or pitch a bait anywhere from 8-25' away from the boat and land it nice and easy in spots the size of a coffee cup.  Good luck doing that with spinning tackle.

 

Everyone is different, and there certainly is a bit of a learning curve, but I think getting into baitcasting reels is well worth the time and money you'll invest.  I got into them 3 years ago and haven't looked back, I rarely reach for a spinning rod now. 


fishing user avatarAbuss55 reply : 

I very recently started throwing a baitcaster, and yes it will take some time to get used to it. The above post pretty much said it all, dont get me wrong i still love my spinning gear though. Now that I have and am decent at using a baitcaster the big difference that i noticed is how much lighter it is compared to my larger spinning gear for thowing those larger lures and how much easier it is to work and manipulate them. I still use my spinning gear for lighter finesse rigs, or if I am casting from the bank in some really thick stuff where i dont have a lot of casting room, I do a lot of creek bashing and river/stream fishing. Overall I would say I am very happy I decided to get one and practice using it not only because it does help using those larger lures and for getting longer casts, after you get good enough to turn down your brakes, but just for knowing how to use different applications for catching fish. Good luck and happy fishing!

 

Give someone a fish and they will eat for a day, teach them to fish and they will sit in a boat all day and drink beer.


fishing user avatarmasterbass reply : 

I prefer casting gear, but I could use spinning gear for 90% of my style of fishing.  I'm more accurate with casting gear.  IMO it's more efficient when making multiple casts and pitches.  I even use casting gear for throwing light stuff.  However, the one drawback is the amount of money I've spent on it.  It's become an addiction and the bait monkey has me under his spell.  I've grown to appreciate fine casting gear which is expensive, yet I was totally satisfied with a pflueger president and a $100 spinning rod.  Now I rarely use spinning gear, but I do still prefer it for drop shots.


fishing user avatarThe Great Blue Heron reply : 

They just look cooler. The spinning reel is ok. But if you want to fish like a boss and take decent pics, your gonna need a baitcaster, end of story.

boat2_zpsab35625e.jpg


fishing user avatarBASSPATROL247 reply : 
  On 6/23/2015 at 6:32 AM, Janderson45 said:

this has been talked about ad nauseam I'm sure, but to sum it up in a few points for me...

 

Bait casters are typically used for heavier techniques, and hold heavier line.  For me, the casting rods and reels feel much more equipped to readily throw and retrieve heavier baits, and winch fish out of heavier cover.  Notice i said "winch".. the design of bait casting reels seems to give you a good deal more power over the fish, the line is being directly laid flat on a spool instead of coiling around it, leads to a more powerful "feel" even if the drag may not necessarily be stronger.

 

The second major advantage for bait casters in bass fishing is accuracy... with some practice using different techniques you can practically place a lure in the smallest places with little or no disruption to the water surface.. this is important in making fish holding heavy to cover strike out of pure reaction instead of feeding instinct.  With my casting rods I can flip or pitch a bait anywhere from 8-25' away from the boat and land it nice and easy in spots the size of a coffee cup.  Good luck doing that with spinning tackle.

 

Everyone is different, and there certainly is a bit of a learning curve, but I think getting into baitcasting reels is well worth the time and money you'll invest.  I got into them 3 years ago and haven't looked back, I rarely reach for a spinning rod now.

Id jave to disagree on baitcasters neing more accurate and being able to put baits in the water more quietly,myself i can pitch with either reel and put both in a very small target,its all in fingering the spool just like thumbing a baitcaster. As for actual casting accuracy im a bit better with spinning gear and as for distance spinning gear goes further . This may not be true for everyone but is for me so it comes down to the anglers ability. For me the main advantage in baitcasters over spinning gear is being able to present more different and heavier baits that a spinning reel wich is kinda limited on the baits you can present the right way...


fishing user avatarSlade House reply : 

one word, pitching 


fishing user avatarBASSPATROL247 reply : 
  On 6/23/2015 at 3:17 PM, Slade House said:

one word, pitching

You can pitch with both...


fishing user avatarBassinLou reply : 

Like someone mentioned, this topic is very popular. My opinion in this matter is that, both styles have its advantages and disadvantages. A wise angler will be proficient in both.  To the OP, I would recommend you give b/c's a good try and report back. I have taught several anglers how to use a b/c, and once they get the hang of it, over time they can't believe why they used  the spinner for so long. Good luck!! 


fishing user avatarDelaware Valley Tackle reply : 

You can get by with one or the other. In general, casting tackle handles heavier tackle (12#> line) with less hassle. They're just different tools for different circumstances. It's not either/or for me. IMO mastering different types of tackle (casting, spinning, fly and center pin all catch bass for me) is part or the fun and enhances the overall fishing experience. 


fishing user avatarjunyer357 reply : 

To me its just like the debate on lines. There is no clear winner, just personal preferences, comfort and best for particular lure/technique. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. I prefer baitcaster for most lures over 3/16oz and everyday fishing overall. I prefer spinners for balsa cranks, weightless rigs, and small light lures.

I cant throw a 1/8oz roostertail on a bc to save my life but its a breeze on a spinner. At the same time if i threw 40# braid with a frog in thick grass i would just kill my drag with a spinner but winch right on out with a bc.

Its a matter of using the best tool for the job. Most folks i know that are good fishermen will use both to their strengths.


fishing user avatareinscodek reply : 

The baitcasting reel is practically a winch.. the design just is built to haul in heavy fish.. are all baitcasters built to haul big fish.. no but the general design is for haulin.  Thats the main advantage of a BC.  The other is that u could literally bomb casts further than anything with heavier lures if yer a good freespooler.. I'm not a good freespooler..

 

Theres no accuracy difference.. I saw a video once where some championship caster used s wimpy whippy spinning rod and put his lure everywhere a dime could fit on a casting range... nah the accuracy is about practice.


fishing user avatarJ Francho reply : 

Here we go again. You might as well title it the advantages of a screwdriver, and tell us all why it's better than a hammer. Baitcaster, level wind, conventional, spinning, mooching, centrepin, fly reel, etc., all have their place.


fishing user avatarmonkeyman3dee reply : 

With a bait caster it is easier to reel and still have your finger on the line to better detect line vibrations. Helpful when slowly fishing a jig.

 

 

Not a deal breaker, but a nice advantage over spinning. I personally like both, maybe b/c a little more, just because of the feel and speed. I recommend a lews laser mg. Wont cost you an arm n a leg and finely built. 


fishing user avatarCatt reply : 

There is no advantage!

I can throw a wacky trick worm effectively with my Calcutta and have a friends who pitches jigs with his Stradic, neither of us is at a disavantage.

Winch?

Spinning reels do come bigger than perch jerking size!


fishing user avatarTrek reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 4:31 AM, Catt said:

There is no advantage!

I can throw a wacky trick worm effectively with my Calcutta and have a friends who pitches jigs with his Stradic, neither of us is at a disavantage.

Winch?

Spinning reels do come bigger than perch jerking size!

  A trick worm and a say 3/8 oz jig is not the same bait. The question was what is the advantage of a bait caster. Pitching a 3/8 oz jig with a spinning reel no matter what the size is not going to be as easy or accurate as using a bait caster. Same as skipping under a dock. The spinning reel has an advantage. Each have there advantages.


fishing user avatarGlenn reply : 

It's like asking, "Which is better, a hammer or a screwdriver?"

 

You need to learn and use both.


fishing user avatarMaster Bait'r reply : 

Each has their strength.

BC reels are great for avoiding line twist, provides high drags with low profiles and can offer flat out silly low weight and compact profiles for what they do. BC reels are for power approaches IMO, even if it's more of a finesse technique that you're using. Accuracy and the "feel" of the bait in flight is another advantage- when your thumb controls much of the arc, drop, splash etc you stand to gain a pretty decent advantage across a lot of conditions.

Spinning reels to me are for really light powers/actions, light line and mostly finesse techniques that require delicate attention to drag and line to avoid bending hooks, or that require feeling the tiniest of ticks.

Different strokes for different folks though- neither style is a requirement and variety is the spice of life. There are no rules!!


fishing user avatarCatt reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 5:15 AM, Trek said:

A trick worm and a say 3/8 oz jig is not the same bait. The question was what is the advantage of a bait caster. Pitching a 3/8 oz jig with a spinning reel no matter what the size is not going to be as easy or accurate as using a bait caster. Same as skipping under a dock. The spinning reel has an advantage. Each have there advantages.

You care to come down & fish against Garrett Daigle pitching jigs?


fishing user avatarCatt reply : 

Really y'all need to search youtube ;)


fishing user avatarSirSnookalot reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 4:31 AM, Catt said:

There is no advantage!

I can throw a wacky trick worm effectively with my Calcutta and have a friends who pitches jigs with his Stradic, neither of us is at a disavantage.

Winch?

Spinning reels do come bigger than perch jerking size!

I 100% agree.

IMO the misconception is finesse vs power, in my world of fishing those 2 words don't exist.  The rod and reel is merely a tool to deliver the lure to a designated spot, whatever you're more accurate with that's the tool for you. When people talk finesse they generally refer to a fairly light rod and reel set up, quite true it would more difficult to pull fish out of heavier cover.  I do believe the rod is what pulls fish out of cover and not the reel.  I could use a mh spinning rod lock the drag like many b/c users do and pull bass out of cover the same way. 

I can take that same mh spinning rod use 1/4 oz lure in some situations or a 2 oz lure and catch some really hefty fish, am I finesse or power fishing?  I'm doing neither, I'm delivering my lure where I want it to go. 

 

If there is a significant difference it may be in the line being using for each.  The b/c will handle heavier mono lines, for me using braid and spinning I'm not losing any strength but I am gaining line capacity.  It really boils down to no advantage either way, just preference.


fishing user avatarTrek reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 9:13 AM, Catt said:

You care to come down & fish against Garrett Daigle pitching jigs?

  I'm not claiming to be any kind of pro here just stating there is advantages to both. Ask any pro to fish a day with your Garrett and I bet they bring both set ups. Must be a reason for it.


fishing user avatarCatt reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 4:56 PM, Trek said:

I'm not claiming to be any kind of pro here just stating there is advantages to both. Ask any pro to fish a day with your Garrett and I bet they bring both set ups. Must be a reason for it.

Please read the post above yours

The advantage or disadvantage is between our ears, anglers who are proficient with either reel will be able to use it for any technique.

I don't know how many "Pros" you know but I know quite a few who do not own a spinning reel.


fishing user avatarMaster Bait'r reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 9:13 AM, Catt said:

You care to come down & fish against Garrett Daigle pitching jigs?

He who has the best time fishing is the best fisherman IMO... Therefore I feel I would absolutely give him a run for his money!!! :D


fishing user avatarMaster Bait'r reply : 
  On 6/24/2015 at 7:47 PM, Catt said:

Please read the post above yours

The advantage or disadvantage is between our ears, anglers who are proficient with either reel will be able to use it for any technique.

I don't know how many "Pros" you know but I know quite a few who do not own a spinning reel.

I will agree with this. Certain setups lend themselves to certain techniques simply by way of form and function- that said there is no one way to do anything in fishing and it's all very wrapped up in personal preference. Those most familiar with the technique being used will be the most proficient at it's implementation regardless of the setup.

There is no wrong way to catch fish though. If you're doing it you're doing it! :)




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