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SPELLING IS SOOOOOO OVER RATED !!!!!!!!!!!!


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

Ok so I got your attention. It seems a lot of you think that spelling is important to getting a sponsor. Well I disagree. I have a Major sponsor and I cant spell. A lot of times I am too lazy to even use spell check and I dont realy care too. You guys are who are trying to get sponsors need to understand , THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO A COMPANY IS,  CAN YOU SELL THEIR PRODUCTS!!!!!!!!!!  Not how well you can spell or how many tournaments you have won. If Joe Blow askes me for a sponsorship and he has already had stores place orders for my baits guess what? I am going to give the guy free stuff. I am willing to bet that most other companies would also weither they are little like mine or Huge like the second largest manufacturer of reels in the world. I know because I am sponsored by them and I cant spell and I have never even fished in a bass tournament let alone win one. Why would they sponsor me? Its simple, When sombody asks my advise on swimbait gear I recomend them. Not because I get free stuff but because its what I personaly use and believ in and I was doing this WAY BEFORE they ever contacted me.

Please dont think I am bragging because I am not I am just trying to emphasize how important it is that you can sell their products.

I will say this though, If I was going to send a resume I would do spell check on it. It couldnt hurt.


fishing user avatarLow_Budget_Hooker reply : 

I can see your side of it, if KVD were dyslexic, he'd still be KVD but in the general public, people trying to attain connections, spelling is job 1 when communications is the bulk of your efforts.  

There ARE other ways, matt is a fine example, but for the person looking to go proffesional and campaign his way there, oration, dictation and grammar are very important.


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

You sir are absolutly right. My original post about spelling was not the main point. I am just trying to say if you want to get sponsored show the company that you can be usefull to them Before you ask. It would be very hard for a company to say no if you are already selling their product. In my case they actually contacted me.


fishing user avatarfishbear reply : 

or-who??   dict-what??? and what does my grammma hav to due wit it?????

;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D


fishing user avatarLow_Budget_Hooker reply : 

I agree Chris.  In a previous post, the question has been asked "how do I contact sponsors?"

The reply in my head is....if you're doing it right, THEY should be contacting YOU


fishing user avatarearthworm77 reply : 

Consider this.....if someone sent me a resume with grammatical errors and mispellings, it would make me feel as if they didn't care enough to do it the right way. How could I or anyone reviewing this resume take it serious enough. Obviously that person doesn't care enough to put in a 100% effort to represent themselves in the most positive way to me, they certainly will not put in 100% to represent my cvompany....delete resume...next. Spelling is absolutely important the exception being KVD or an elite Pro but there is no doubt that any of those guys would have anything they submitted polished enough to be acceptable. Being able to market yourself and the company's product is the most important aspect of getting sponsored.......however presenting yourself in a positve light is a major aspect in setting a good first impression. Spelling a word wrong or leaving out a period is one thing but a choppy resume with atrocious grammar is a whole different story.

Matt you bring up a good point but if I may ask, does your sponsorship have anything to do with your swimbaits? I mean, let's say you had a rod sponsor that picked you up to tout a line of swimbait rods. To me that would be a no brainer for them. You are already established as one of the premiere swimbait makers in the land. So in this case spelling would be little concern because these guys might well have contacted you first to promote their gear. For the average Joe, a good first impression is essential and likely the first contact is made by Joe through written medium. Spelling is key for that first impression to go over well.

Bottom line dot your I's and cross your T's because to anyone reviewing something you submit, it may be the thing that makes or breaks you. For me it is very important.


fishing user avatarroadwarrior reply : 

When you "Got It", you can do what you please, everybody cares about you.

When you are trying to "Get It", nobody cares...

Dot your i's, cross your t's and polish your shoes. There is only one, first impression.


fishing user avatarpreach4bass reply : 
  Quote
I can see your side of it, if KVD were dyslexic, he'd still be KVD.

No, he'd be DVK ;)


fishing user avatarLow_Budget_Hooker reply : 

LMAO  


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

Craig you are right and you are right. I know I am sponserd mostly becuase of my baits but it is also becuase I can sell their rods and reels. I agree it looks lazy and your spelling and grammer should be proper. My main point is that if somebody is trying to get a sponser it is soooo much better to have already helped that company by way of sales than it is to have a great resume. I am sure big companies get resumes every day and ignore most of them. For instance if I wanted to be sponsored by Micromunch I would first go to all my local stores and convince them to carry your products. That would take some work and good sales skills. I dont even think I would send a resume, I would just call you up and tell you who I was and how I just got you some accounts.

I bet if I asked for some free product and a patch you would say yes. I am just saying that the emails I personaly get asking for sponsorship and the resumes dont impress me much.

I will say this when big pros email me or call me I give them discounts. On a side note Rick Clunn called to buy a bunch of baits but would not let me give them to him. I had to talk him into letting me give him a discount. He is just a good person!


fishing user avatarGeorge Welcome reply : 

"When you "Got It", you can do what you please, everybody cares about you."

So much of the above is so accurate.

"Definitions as it relates to this fishing industry: sponsored - Rod A breaks and you need a new one; simply call and the sponsor sends a new one next day air, no charge.  Low on bait product and you need more; simply call and the sponsor sends what you want next day air, no charge. Product discounts given are such that you can actually make money selling the product - for example outboard motors and boats."

What do these sponsors expect from people they might sponsor: first that that person actually have the forum and ability to represent their product to people that will listen to that person because of his/her history. Someone other than a neighbor needs to vouch for that person. The first question that will be asked is: who the heck are you and what have you done?

It gets a lot deeper, but suffice it to say: get some experience that will prove your ability to get people to listen to you, and in this industry that means get recognition in your ability to catch fish.

If you want to be a salesman for any company that is involved in this fishing industry then send them a resume and apply for a sales position, but if you want to be sponsored, get out and catch some fish: get recognized for your ability and they will come to you.


fishing user avatarChris reply : 
  Quote
When you "Got It", you can do what you please, everybody cares about you.

When you are trying to "Get It", nobody cares...

Dot your i's, cross your t's and polish your shoes. There is only one, first impression.

I agree :)


fishing user avatarJT Bagwell reply : 
  Quote
It would be very hard for a company to say no if you are already selling their product.

I disagree to some extent. I present the old saying -

"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free?"

I have been told of several cases where an angler wears

the patches and has the stickers on everything he owns,

but can't get an entry level sponsorship from the company.

Also, I am curious to know the level of sponsorships that

people are getting approached with. I can understand guys

like VanDam, Swindle, Ike and others of that caliber, but for

the regional or lesser known tour pro, I have a hard time believing

that a company is approaching them with cash sponsorships. I

clearly do not fall into the category with Ike and KVD and I can

say that only once have I been contacted by a major fishing company

to promote their products. That came about when the owner of the

company read an article I wrote for a National magazine. In the article

I mentioned (very briefly) his product. He made a couple of calls, got my

telephone number and when I got home there was a message on my

voicemail.

My cash and major product business agreements have all been the result

of me approaching the companies. In most of the cases, I was fortunate that

someone at the company had already read one of my articles or something

of that nature so I at least had minimal name recognition.

As Ish Monroe told me a few years ago "You can't pay your bills with a few crankbaits

and you can't eat them for dinner either."

JT Bagwell


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

JT I only speak from my own experiance. If I have  a guy send me an email asking for some free product I almost always dont even respond. If that same guy has contacted a few stores and they want to or have placed orders thats a diferent story. I will gladly give them freebees as long as the store orders are big enough to warrent free baits. I dont mean they have to buy hundreds but I also dont mean have a store buy 2 or 3 baits(even then I would give them a discount). That person has showed me that they can and already has promoted my baits and I want to encourage them.

As far as having a sponser contact you, I imagine this is not the norm but thats what has happened with me. I guess I am officialy a prostaff member but this is not like the other prostaff deals I have heard of. My deal is great. My official job is to test prototypes. Rods and reels. I am told to try and break them under normal fishing conditions. I will take freshwater gear and use it in the salt, I will throw big swimbaits on gear that is not designed for it. I basicaly fish the gear xtra hard and try and break it. Then I send them a report. That is my job. If I do manage to break something they send me a new one to keep or to keep testing but I always get to keep all the gear I test. On top of that I have a yearly budget Of free gear of my choice. If I wish to buy more gear than my budget, I get it at wholesale cost.

I only pay shipping on the gear I buy after I use my budget. So by definition I would consider them a sponser even though they classify me as a "2nd leval prostaff" I have no other obligations to them. I recomend them because I believe in their products and I do post about them on the boards when sombody asks about them I give my honest opinion.  BUT I was doing this before they ever contacted me.

I have recieved two other very high end rods from diferent companies for me to fish. both of these comanies hinted that they wanted me on their prostaff but I am loyal to my sponser and I wouldnt do that. They both told me to keep the rods. I understand that the reason companies contacted me is because my baits are popular but my original sponser contacted me  before my baits were as known.

The reason I started this post is to help guys get sponsors and I firmly believe that if they go out and get those companies a few accounts than they will have a hard time saying no to them. I am not talking about wearing patches or puting stickers on thier boats. That does nothing for me. I dont even have stickers or patches. I prety much dont give away stuff for nothing but if you have already helped me I have no problem helping you. On a side note I go to 1 or 2 huge shows a year and have met most of all the big named pros. I dont give them free stuff either but I do give them discounts. If they talk about my baits on TV or write about them in an article than they get some stuff for free. This is how I do it and I have many friends in the industry (some little and some major companies) now and they pretty much do it the same way. I am sure not all of them do it like that though.


fishing user avatarJT Bagwell reply : 

Matt,

I think the way you handle business is probably close to the "norm" for

small to mid-sized companies. The ones that still have somewhat of a

personal approach to its customers and partners. I guess I was looking

at it from the view of a large multi-country corporation. When I look at

it from a different perspective, I see exactly where you are coming from.

I was thinking more along the lines of: I can not believe that Triton, Yamaha,

Daiwa and etc. are calling local or regional anglers offering them contracts.

JT Bagwell


fishing user avatarBASS fisherman reply : 

I love posts like this one.

But, I'd like to ask a question.

If someone contacts a few companies and they send you free product, and you use and like the product enough to recommend it to others, would that person be obligated to try and set up a couple accounts at local tackle shops for those companies that sent the free product?


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

JT you are right. I imagine the huge companies dont go out seeking the fisherman too much, however my sponser is Okuma and they are the second largest reel manufacturer in the world. Second only to Shimano,yes they are bigger than Diawa. Them calling me whas what I meant was probably not the norm espicialy since I dont fish tournaments. I am furtunate!

BASS fisherman I think if you contacted them and they sent you product then you should be obligated to help that company out, after all you asked and they gave. It also depends on the amount they gave you. You and that company should discus what is expected. I think all deals should be win win with both parties benifiting. I have seen post were companies are seeking prostaff members and they sure seem to be getting the better end of the deal. The poor prostaff guy has to sell x amount of product just for a small discount and if he sells a bunch, he might get a shirt. The guy is definatley getting the worst end just so he can be called "pro staff" I would stay away from those deals as much as possible


fishing user avatarcart7t reply : 
  Quote
Ok so I got your attention. It seems a lot of you think that spelling is important to getting a sponsor. Well I disagree. I have a Major sponsor and I cant spell. A lot of times I am too lazy to even use spell check and I dont realy care too.

So you didn't have the gumption to learn how to spell and now, in the computer age, you don't even bother to use a point and click program that does the work for you?  Why would I ever consider someone like you in the first place when I've got a desk full of resumes?

  Quote
THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO A COMPANY IS,  CAN YOU SELL THEIR PRODUCTS!!!!!!!!!!  Not how well you can spell or how many tournaments you have won.

So what you're saying is, you can be a non-speller AND who isn't even successful at fishing, at least in a competitive way and still get companies willing to give away free merchandise or even, gasp,,,, put money in your pocket?  

What you've basically described is a salesmans job. And Just so I don't insult the salesman out there, I have a feeling most salesman have a better grasp of the English language than you do.  I have no idea what you're credentials are. I've never heard of you and frankly, I wouldn't buy any lure, reel or rod because you suggested it.  I might pay attention if you were in a competitive enviroment and winning tournaments consistantly against other anglers that are highly skilled but you're merely an internet poster who sounds like you've sold yourself as a rod n reel salesman.  Companies hire those guys all the time, they're called sales reps and they get free stuff just like you.  It's a job but I'd hardly describe what you're doing as getting real sponsors in the sense that most anglers on this board consider.

BTW, there are a lot of young people on this board. The last thing I would ever try and preach to any of them is that correct spelling isn't important.  Geezus,  just because you don't want to put any effort into communicating clearly with others is no reason to encourage the younger anglers around here to do the same.  Have some respect for those of us who take the language a little more seriously.


fishing user avatarcart7t reply : 

BTW Matt, just so you don't take my post too offensively, I'd suggest you're getting sponsorships is more due to where you live and what you're doing than anything else.

It's no secret that the next world record bass will probably come from CA waters. If I'm a lure, rod, reel, etc. manufacturer I'd certainly seek out anyone in that area that was fishing for large bass exclusively and pitch an offer to them.  It doesn't cost them much out of pocket and there's always the chance they could cash in BIG if you happen to stumble on and catch the next world record.  In the meantime enjoy what you're getting.  It's a lot different in the rest of the country and a lot harder sell.  


fishing user avatarGlenn reply : 

Ease up Cart.

I think Matt's point is that THE PRIMARY reason companies sponsor somebody is because that person can fatten their bottom line.  

Being a tourny pro? That's one way to get their attention, but if you can't close the deal (sell it to your fans), you aren't worth much to them.  You better be able to sell your sponsor's products.  If you're a great writer, then leverage your talent by writing copy and articles that sell their products. Can't write or spell?  Then you better be a good speaker and great salesman.  Catch trophy bass?  Then you better be able to sell your sponsors' products using any means available to you.

Do you need to be a tournament angler?  No, not at all.  I know a ton of guys who are sponsored who are nothing more than weekend warriors.  But they sure as heck can sell!

Yes, spelling is important no matter what, and I doubt Matt is trying to belittle its importance.  But companies offering sponsorships are willing to overlook it if you can fatten up their bottom line by other means.  Just forget about sending them a resume.  Use your other talents instead.


fishing user avatarGatorbassman reply : 

Let's look at my good friend and member Triton Mike. He is sponsord by Gary Y, Lucky Craft, Motor Guide and several other good companies. But he doesn't fish a single tournament. He guides and travles for his sponsors for seminars and he writes for Inside Line. His knoledge sells and he knows how to get the word out for his sponsors. So he is a prime example.


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

Cart I don't think you read the entire thread. If so, you missed the point. The reason I posted the title is because I have seen a lot of posts in the resume section about how a resume should be perfect and how it should have proper grammar. Why is this a problem? The problem is the guys think that the resume itself is a lot more important than it really is. Like I have said many, many times, companies care more about your ability to sell their products than anything else. You say that just makes you a sales man, well Yes and no. You do not actually have to go out and literally sell product but there are many other ways. The reason for my post (WHICH YOU SO OBVIOUSLY MISSED !!!!!!) was to encourage guys to go out and do something to get a sponsor. Go out and get that company a few accounts, right an article and get it published, get people to use the company's product before you contact them. My whole freaking point was to not focus on a resume. Of course after you do something that gets their attention you should use proper grammar in any email or letter you send them.

I don't know how you missed this. Maybe you were too busy with you red correction pen to actually read what was posted.

You may not have heard of me but many have. I have big name pros picking my brain when it comes to swimbaits. I am sponsored because I do occasionally catch a big bass but most importantly I get hundreds of emails from guys asking my advise on rods,reels,line,teqhniques etc. Why do they ask me? Well first off I am approachable and friendly. Second they want to learn about swimbaits. You must be an English teacher or something similar to get so worked up over grammar. And if you think I have wronged the youth of this site by telling them that spelling and grammar is not important you are nuts. First I only said that in the title to get attention and if the youth follow my advise they may actually get a sponsor instead of waiting their time sending out a perfectly written resume!

Class dismissed.


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

A while ago he sent me an email telling me he was talking about my baits in one of his seminars. In this email he attached some photos. The photos showed a slide show with Mike in the front of the room speaking. On the screen was a photo from my website showing my baits so he was obviously talking about them. He also showed from the back of the room that the room was packed. So before he ever sent me an email, he did something for me....FIRST!!!! When he sent me this email he didn't ask for anything. Guess what I did? Well I'll tell you what I didn't do. I didn't go over his email with spell check to make sure the spelling was correct ;D ;D ;D . I was impressed. I get at least 2 resume type emails a week and sometimes more. Normally I just don't respond. They don't impress me. Its not that there is anything wrong with them, but if I gave something to everyone who asked I would go broke. Triton Mike's example is a perfect one that supports my entire theory. My response to Mike was, I gave him some free baits as a thank you. He never even asked but I still would have given them to him if he would have. I also plan on letting him test new prototypes when I have them ready for testing. Why would I give him free stuff if he were already "selling" my product? Because of all the guys asking for freebees he went out and did something first. I don't care if he has ever won a tournament. He filled that seminar room and he was talking about my product. I am sure he mentioned several other too, maybe even my competition but I don't care. People should follow his example.

Look at who has sponsored him. It works with big companies too!

To all that took the "spelling" thing too seriously, understand that was just to emphasize my point. If my poor grammar and my misspelled words affends you I apologize ;)


fishing user avatarcart7t reply : 
  Quote
Ease up Cart.

I think Matt's point is that THE PRIMARY reason companies sponsor somebody is because that person can fatten their bottom line.  

Being a tourny pro? That's one way to get their attention, but if you can't close the deal (sell it to your fans), you aren't worth much to them.  You better be able to sell your sponsor's products.  If you're a great writer, then leverage your talent by writing copy and articles that sell their products. Can't write or spell?  Then you better be a good speaker and great salesman.  Catch trophy bass?  Then you better be able to sell your sponsors' products using any means available to you.

Do you need to be a tournament angler?  No, not at all.  I know a ton of guys who are sponsored who are nothing more than weekend warriors.  But they sure as heck can sell!

Yes, spelling is important no matter what, and I doubt Matt is trying to belittle its importance.  But companies offering sponsorships are willing to overlook it if you can fatten up their bottom line by other means.  Just forget about sending them a resume.  Use your other talents instead.

Isn't that the bottomline of any salesmans job?  

My point was this, Matt lives in a part of the country where the bass grow to freakish proportions. If you're an angler fishing specifically for those fish and you're catching fish in the 12-15lb range I'm not surprised there are companies wanting to attach their products to those fish catches.  OTOH, fish of that size in the rest of the country are rare so you're going to have to use something else as a selling point if you want sponsors anywhere east of southern California.  Whether it's tournament results or success as a guide or some other benchmark, you have to have something to prove your mettle in order to get manufacturers to give you something.  In the case of this very board, your contact and first impression is usually via a resume.  While it's always a good idea to do something different on your resume to catch a potential sponsors eye, I have a feeling a mis-spelled resume is the wrong kind of different.


fishing user avatardink reply : 

I have to agree with Cart on this one.  Many people on this site talk about helping out the younger ones here and they do.  But Matt's initial title to this thread was very misleading to those of all ages.  Fact is, 99% of people here will never be a fully sponsored professional in this industry.  And to tell them that spelling is over-rated is simply ridiculous, especially if they choose to apply this notion to everyday life.  I actually know someone who told me that they dropped out of school after 10th grade because they already knew enough for the work they were going into and because the  teachers were always acting like they knew better than he did.  I couldn't believe what I was hearing.  

I get the point that Matt was trying to get across.  I agree that performance will outweigh grammar in the task at hand (unless it is proofreading).  Yet, I also know that a person who is articulate enough to care about spelling and grammar will ALWAYS get more attention and be taken more seriously.    


fishing user avatarMattlures reply : 

The title does not say its ok to use bad grammar. It simply says spelling is over rated, meaning there are other things that are far more important in getting sponsored than the spelling of your resume.

Cart I think you got it and didn't even realize it. ALL SPONSORED FISHERMAN ARE SALESMEN!!!!!! Nobody pays you or gives you product just for you to fish. They expect something in return. You need to benefit the company somehow or you're not worth the "free" product. This is reality

My getting sponsored has nothing to do with the world record living here. I used their products and spoke well about them. I recommended them and they heard about it. I mentioned them on my website. My swimbaits have become one of the more popular brands of swimbaits. They are in magazines all the time and have been on TV several times. I am a good bass fisherman but I choose not to compete because I simply do not have the time. I am sponsored because I am useful to the company that sponsors me. I provide a service. I help test their prototypes and I do use their products and recommend it to others. Does this mean that this would work for everybody? No it's just an example. Glenn's post says it all. There are millions of guys out there fishing tournaments that will never reach the elite level. Unless they learn how to "sell" themselves first and a product second then they will never get or keep a big sponsor. I am helping the youth by telling them about this reality.

Like I said before I get many resumes sent to me and I basically ignore them.

There are certain guys who I seek out to give stuff to. These are guys who I feel would be most beneficial to me.

As far as spelling and grammar goes, get this in your heads. Nobody is going to sponsor you based on your spelling and grammar. They may decide to NOT sponsor you because of it though. So yes it is important to use good grammar and spelling on you resume and you should. BUT if you want to become sponsored you need to make yourself marketable first. You need to be a "salesman" Every big pro is a salesman!

If I get a couple resumes a week imagine what Berkley gets. They must get hundreds weekly. You are competing with thousands of other hopeful sponsories. Why should they pick you over everybody else when 98% of the other resumes are well written? That is the question you need to focus on.

That is my whole point.

BTW Mr. Cart I have no hard feelings towards you. I obviously struck a nerve with the spelling thing. GOOD that was its intention. I wanted people to realize that the resume should be sent AFTER the potential applicant has made himself or herself marketable in some way. If you read all of the post you will get the point. I believe it would be extremely difficult to get any real sponsor on just your fishing credentials. Only very successful anglers carry that kind of weight, but even they have to be able to "sell"

I also did a spell check just for you :)


fishing user avatarcart7t reply : 

Very good reply Matt.  I'm sure that's what you were initially trying to say but it just didn't come out that way.  I agree.  No manufacturer gives anyone anything, from a boat all the way down to a slip sinker unless they have some assurance that somewhere along the line they'll see some return on their investment, regardless of the size of that investment.  


fishing user avatarTriton_Mike reply : 

I am sorry I caught this post a little late here but thought I would give some input. BTW Matt thanks for the kind words :)

I've been in the fishing industry for 25 years. I am also the national prostaff manager for a line company for the past year almost. Let me tell you a little bit about the resume's I receive. It was certainly an eye opener for me.

99.9% of the resume's I get are anglers that have quite a 1 page sometimes 2,3 pages of tournament experience and they wear the patches and put the decals on the trucks and cars and boats etc etc.

If you match the above description in bold your competing with about 1 million other anglers. Gonna be a tough job getting a very GOOD sponsorship deal at ANY level

It's one thing to have a TON of tournament experience but can you sell product??? Can you influence people and get our product in front of the consumer and close a sale?? I got to the point that I got so many tournament resume's it was hard to decipher what to do to make a decision.

So what I am doing now is taking a completely different approach to this job. When I get resume's with a ton of tournament experience I fire them back an email saying wow cool tournament experience but what can you do for us aside from fishing tournaments?? Do you write articles for magazines, newspapers, internet etc? How about TV, radio? What about doing seminars with a sizable audience?? Can you draw an audience?? Can you get me dealers?? If so can you give me references from companies that you have already gotten dealers for?? Do you guide?? Do you even use our lines?? (You'd be surprised at the answers I get on that last question), can you communicate to me on a quarterly basis with QAULITY reports on what you are doing besides fishing tournaments? etc etc etc. 9 times out of 10 I get NO response back..

Guys if you want sponsorships seperate yourself from others. The more niche's (as described above and not limited to the options listed above) you have the more valuable you become to companies both big and small. 99.9% of the anglers fish tournaments and I can tell you this right now tournaments will not seperate you from anyone unless you are just really really good at it (extremely rare). Just because you fish tournaments doesn't mean the companies should fall over giving you product or $$.

One other rule of thumb that I learned a while back. If you sponsor hop often enough your going to end up with a bad reputation very very quickly. Most of the guys in the fishing industry knows somebody that knows you. Whether it be a previous sponsor or a present sponosor. I can find ways to find out info about you and your character and the quality of work that you do. The fishing industry "fishes" very very very small. It's OK to change sponsors but you better be doing it for the right reasons and that reason is because you believe in the product. If you haven't used a potential sponsors product and accept a sponsorship your doing not only yourself a disservice but your audience as well. If I preach Lucky Craft hardbaits today and Pradco tomorrow what does that say about my credibility?? Associate yourself with the BEST and stay wtih the best and create a name for yourself by associating yourself with the best products not which company gives you a better deal to switch. Also don't accept a sponsorship just because you "CAN". If your not going to use a potential sponsors product don't accept the deal. They will respect you more by being honest than taking them for a ride. Remember the fishing industry "fishes" small comment that I made. Hopefully this will help others.

BTW I can spell but my grammer is the pits. I get the wife to proofread my magazine stuff before I submit it ;). My wife calls me the run on sentence king LOL

Mike




2023

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